Slow DVD burning

ber1122

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#1
Hi,

I am using nero burning... 7 out of 10 burn take more 15mins for 8x.. sometime 20mins... any one encounter this before.. ????
 

Emeralda

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#2
A full DVD (~4.4GB) on that speed takes always about 25 minutes or so for me so I guess this is quite normal.
 

Nori

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#3
Yea DVDs don't burn like CDs, they are much bigger in size. Honestly 15-20 min is really fast.

CDs = 700 MB (full) and DVDs are 4.7 GB (full).
 

Emeralda

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#4
4.7GB is only if you count 1MB as 1000KB which is not true. True size should be about ~4.45GB of anime I can usually burn on one DVD.
 

Nori

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#5
Either way, my point still stands that burning DVDs wont be as fast as CDs.
 

Entombment

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#6
lol It may be old, but I feel the need to do this

The DVD actually does hold 4.7 GB. And can only be overwritten over to a certain extent. The DVD process adds files due to the writing process, so depending on how the DVD is burned and the media on it, will determine how much space is used

Burning files as 'data' discs, allows for the full amount of space, because it will only be used to read the files themselves, and not in any special sort of way

Media discs to be used for play in DVD players and the like, have to be burned in certain ways with special files. Which is why those are calculated by the amount of time the movie contains, rather than the space. It requires a certain configuration file, to allow it too be read in the DVD player

Also, here's a need little table I did just for you guys xD Though the same thing is probably everywhere else

1 Bit: Nothing, base for storage
1 Byte: 8 Bits
1 Kilobyte: 1,024 Bytes/8,192 Bits
1 Megabyte: 1,024 Kilobytes/1,048,576 Bytes/8,388,608 Bits
1 Gigabyte: 1,024 Megabytes/1,073,741,824 Bytes/8,589,934,592 Bits
1 Terabyte: 1,024 Gigabytes/1,099,511,627,776 Bytes/8,796,093,022,208 Bits
1 Petabyte: 1,024 Terabytes/1,125,899,906,842,624 Bytes/9,007,199,254,740,992 Bits
 
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#7
Well, when referring to space, there are two definitions...
Traditionally, yes, the computer uses 1024 as the jump between bytes, kilobytes, megabytes, etc.
Most operating systems and programs (including windows) use 1024.

Computer storage manufacturers usually advertise their product with 1000 rather than 1024.
(of course they do, they are trying to sell their product, it sounds better if it has bigger numbers even if it is the same size... sly ones >.>)

in any case, both are called terabytes, gigabytes, megabytes, kilobytes, etc... so they're not exactly lying, just taking advantage of terms with multiple definitions.

It is pretty annoying though if you get a 500 "GB" (billion bytes) hard drive with only 465 gigabytes of capacity :p

and some commission decided to change the name for the 1024 one, but since the names they suggest using are lame, I'm not gonna mention them :tongue: