[Beta] HSD Commentary Thread

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Kaze Araki

Libertarian Communist
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#1
Commentary Rules:

1. Strictly no spam or personal attack of any kind (valid or invalid does not matter) is allowed.

2. This commentary thread is open for all users except for the two debaters.
3. This thread function as a place for the follower of the debate to post their own opinions regarding the debate. The two debaters are not allowed to reply these opinions in this thread (this is done to prevent them from derailing their focus from the debate thread itself).
4. Both debaters can insert a reply inside the debate thread, for any point raised in this thread. However, care must be taken to ensure that the reply serve only as supplementary, and the major feature of the debater's post would still be mainly focusing on rebutting the other debater.
5. Commentary thread will open from the start of the debate (Round 1: Prologue) and will remain open until the voting days end.


Commentary Time:

19th September 2011 - 25th September 2011 (GMT+0:00, DST=Off)
 

Core

Fascinating...
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#2
Theres no telling what will trigger a person to commit rape. The trigger could be an action, clothing or personal features.

Yes less clothing leads to more revealed features but if the rapist likes to unwrap his present like on christmas morning then the statement that women should dress less like sluts holds absolutely no meaning.

It is of course less likely that a rapist will be triggered by a girl who's wearing so many clothes you cant tell if its a girl.

-.- <- Seriousface.
 

Zero Phoenix

The Second Coming of Hazama
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#3
While it can be challenging to determine "when" a person might commit an act of rape, it is possible to point out possible rapists by investigating their background. Psychological issues, violent behavior, issues with authority, many warning signs of future criminals are seen as early as eight years old. If we can examine the pathological behavior of rapists we can predict the actions of future offenders.

While women can opt to wear more clothes to dissuade potential rapists, and while I certainly think it is improper to dress in a provocative manner while one is in public, women (in America) have the freedom to wear whatever they want. It would be unconstitutional to force women to dress a certain way. We're not the middle east. :smart: Side Note: It would be interesting to review the number of rape cases in the Arab world and the circumstances surrounding them. In this way, we can determine if fashion is really an issue. For example, between a woman in a Abaya and a woman in a bikini who has a better chance of getting raped? Why?
 

Arachna

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#4
Clothes are self-expression, but you have to be aware it can trigger things in other people. That is not something you can control. Naturally, people react with certain biases to people who look one way or another. There is a specific fear that a girl wearing revealing clothes might give off unintended sexual signals. I do agree with that.

Society does not say don't rape, it says don't get raped. Everywhere you look, the onus is on the woman to not experience harassment, and there's very little to say, actually we condemn rape. Only 6.5% of all rape cases end in conviction. That shows this attitude is extremely dangerous. Today woman can make of herself what she will. She is making her mind as free as her body. Does a belly shirt mean fashion, sexual availability,pride in one’s body, that it is incredibly hot outside, or sheer habit? Is girls’ clothing a consistent language, or does its meaning change across space and time?

Over all the debate was interesting. Both had good points and stated facts. <3
 
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#5
I want to address the core of the argument that is in support of the officer's statement. Much of this centers around blaming the victims of rape for the violence that others have committed against them, which is unproductive and offensive. When it comes down to it, the only person really to blame for a rape is the rapist. Placing some blame on victims relieves the rapist, in part, of responsibility for the crime. Once one starts to point out things the victim could/should have done differently to avoid being raped, it can be hard to know where to draw the line, since there can be so many factors, many of which have nothing to do with how the victim was dressed. 'don't dress or act provocatively' might seem like helpful advice, but there are differing standards for what 'provocative' means. What about a young person who is raped and sexually abused by a family member? What could that young person have done differently to avoid the crime? Trust their family members less? Run away from home?

Furthermore, not all rapes are the result of the victim carelessly putting themselves in a dangerous situation. People of many different ages, genders, sexual orientations and dressing habits are raped, some for extremely disturbing reasons that apparently have nothing to do with dressing like slut. (e.g. Mass rapes in DRC, corrective rape in South Africa.) and, while the sample perhaps isn't as diverse as the victims, it's not only straight men who commit rape...maybe officer Sanguinetti should revise his statement to be more inclusive. I know I have a hard time controlling myself when I see a ripped dude walking around in nothing but gold hot pants. (I...sense I've gone too far.)
 
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